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Thursday, May 10, 2012

Immunization Is Better Than Cure

A week ago, I brought my kids to our company initiated vaccination program.  It's not free but my wife told me the shots were cheaper than the usual price.  There were 4 vaccines available namely; for Influenza (Flu), Pneumonia, Hepatitis B, and Cervical Cancer HPV.  I had a Pneumococcal vaccination while my kids had their flu shots, having already done with the other needed vaccines.  Sharing some commonly asked questions answered during the orientation at the start of the program:


Flu Vaccine also known as a "flu shot" is an inactive vaccine, containing killed virus, injected through a needle usually in a person's arm or buttock's area.


How often should a person have a flu shot?
Yearly, different virus strain and type is likely to develop each year.

When will it take effect?
Antibodies against influenza viruses will develop about 2 weeks after vaccination.  Therefore, you can still be infected by an ill person within the time being.

Who should not be vaccinated?  
Without a doctor or physician's approval, the following should not receive flu shots:
  • People having severe allergy to chicken eggs;
  • Those who previously had severe reaction to the vaccine;
  • Children younger than 6 months;
  • A person with fever; and 
  • Those with history of Guillain–Barr√© Syndrome.
What side effects may occur?
The flu shot can't give you flu since it contains killed viruses.  However, these side effects may occur after the shot and usually last 1 to 2 days, considering your healthy enough to take the vaccine:
  • Soreness or muscle aches where the shot was given; and
  • Low grade fever

Pneumococcal Vaccine (PPSV23) is for the immunization against 23 strains of pneumonia causing bacterium specifically pneumococcus.  Like the flu shot, it is also injected usually in a person's arm or buttocks.


How long will the vaccine take effect?
A healthy person develops antibodies 2 to 3 weeks after receiving the dose.  Usually, its only good for 5 years protection and another shot is needed afterwards.  But for some people, a single dose is already sufficient and booster doses are no longer required.  Still best, consult your doctor about it.

Are you protected from pneumonia when you had the vaccine shot?
Yes, but only for the 23 strains of pneumococcus bacteria included in the vaccine.  There are more than 80 types of pneumococcus bacteria and other several other microbes that causes pneumonia.  But these 23 types were the most leading cause of the said illness.

Who should receive the vaccine and who should not?
The following people are advisable to receive it:
  • Adult 65 years of age and older;
  • A person more than 2 years old with chronic heart or lung disorder; and,
  • People more than 2 years old with diabetes mellitus,  chronic liver disease, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, blood malignancy (leukemia), immune deficiency (i.e. HIV infected), kidney failure, spleen dysfunction, multiple myeloma, spinal fluid leaks, and organ transplant;
  • Cigarette smokers and alcohol drinkers; and
  • Anyone 2 years and above taking drugs that lowers body resistance such as those in steroids, chemo and radiation therapy.
While these are the people who should seek first their doctor's advice:
  • Those under 2 years of age
  • Persons having history of hypersensitivity or severe reaction to the vaccine;
  • People who are moderately or severely ill; and
  • Pregnant women especially those in their first trimester.
Can a person receive other vaccines together with pneumococcal vaccination?
Yes, inactivated (or killed) viral and bacterial vaccines can be administered at the same time or at any time before or after a dose of PPSV23.

Any side effects?
Again, vaccines don't make you sick.  But, the following may occur to some people:
  • Soreness or redness at the injected portion;
  • Low grade fever;
  • Mild rash; and,
  • Allergic reaction.
Haven't took notes with the other 2 vaccines.  Don't get me wrong, they're equally important.  It's just that too much information is hard to digest (LOL).  So is it worth it?  Absolutely, I wouldn't wait for a member of my family to suffer any of these illnesses before I do something.  You can save much more in prevention than in cure.  The choice for me is really easy, the lives of my family are far more important just to save some money.  Yahweh bless.

22 comments:

  1. Prevention is always better than being sick and I'm sure before a vaccine goes out in the market it has already been tried and tested.

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  2. I agree! best to have immunizations than suffer the consequence.. dito we'd have flu shots every year -because of season change! Plus, required talaga sa mga schools na complete ang immunization ng mga kiddos.

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  3. A lot of my mom friends said its really costly to have all these vaccinations but it's really a must. Parents should really set aside a budget for this. The Only issue is for those parents with limited funds and so many kids they can't afford all these vaccinations. Hopefully the centers can provide more than what they are providing now for free.

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  4. It may be costly to be vaccinated for some illnesses, but being hospitalized is probably more expensive and the trauma is something that cannot be easily dismissed.

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  5. As the popular saying goes, prevention is better than cure. Immunization is one of the basic health preparations that are often overlooked and sometimes, neglected.

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  6. prevention indeed is the best thing to do always! xx

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  7. This reminds me I need to get my daughter in to the doctor so she can get her shots before she starts the 6th grade. Thanks for the reminder Ralph! Kathy

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  8. Avail all vaccine shots while they're still free! Ang mahal naman kasi. Pero diba, health should always go first. Live young and healthy - the less you worry! :-D

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  9. This is so TRUE...
    Our immunity from several kinds of illness
    is not protected enough unless we take immunization vaccine.
    Adults or kids alike.

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  10. I strongly agree that prevention is much better than cure. I don't mind spending some for our vaccines as long as it costs less than what could have been our hospital bills if were not prepared. ^_^

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  11. My little siblings got their flu shots recently. We have to be more careful now, the pollution's getting worse.

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  12. prevention is always better. and I agree with everyone, we have to be more careful since most of us are having a hard time especially with finances.

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  13. my children is updated with vaccination from birth up to this date. one good thing here in the US is that vaccination is free in the health department. children are required to go to the center or their private doctors before school year to update the immunization from birth, make sure they did not miss anything or they do it again.2 copies of the record will then be given , one for school and one for the parent.

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  14. Being immunized adds more comfort for parents since their kids can avoid some complicated diseases.

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  15. EEoowww....I hate immunization. Fear of needles..hahahaha...but in the case of my children though I don't want to see them crying in pain it is still better to see them healthy and away from the disease,virus, etc

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  16. I just had my flu shot...Didn't have the idea what it was really for until I read this... :D

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  17. I totally agree, prevention is better than cure. Immunization is really important to kids and adults too.

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  18. Very informative post! ^◡^
    Our company-initiated vaccination program will be this coming June and will surely take it. Last year, I had flu for 3 days because I didn't avail the flu shot in which I usually do for 3-straight years.

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  19. Your right, preventing is better than cure. Lalo na nowadays very prone tayo sa sakit. Alexis P here.

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  20. this is really a big help to everyone, an information base on experiences. .avoiding and preventing it to happen is much likely important.

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  21. Huhuhu we have to get through the pain of vaccination to be protected. Sad fact. I wish there's like automatic send-through of the drug inside our bodies without having to poke the needle to the skin.

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  22. I think vaccines should be mandatory.. every child must have flu shots.. :)

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